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CALL FOR POTENTIAL CONTRIBUTIONS TO A SYMPOSIUM ON PARASITISM AND SEABIRDS AT THE WORLD SEABIRD CONF

Thierry Boulinier, April 18, 2014
 

Symposium on ‘Eco-epidemiology and evolutionary implications of seabird-parasite interactions’

CALL FOR POTENTIAL CONTRIBUTIONS TO A SYMPOSIUM ON PARASITISM AND SEABIRDS AT THE WORLD SEABIRD CONFERENCE

We would like to invite people who might be interested in presenting their work in the framework of a symposium on parasitism and seabirds to contact us within the next weeks (i.e., until May 1st, 2-weeks before the deadline for Symposium application). We are in the process of putting together such a symposium proposal (see below) and we would like to see whether there are potential contributions that we have not yet identified which might fit well in the symposium proposal.

Current symposium proposition: Title: HOST-PARASITE INTERACTIONS IN SEABIRDS: EVOLUTIONARY ECOLOGY AND ECO-EPIDEMIOLOGICAL ISSUES

Rational for the symposium: Seabirds are well known to be the hosts of a diverse and relatively original set of parasites and pathogens. Most seabird species are also widely distributed, migratory, long-lived, colonial and site faithful, which make them particularly important for studies on host-parasite interactions, notably on the ecology and evolution of these interactions. For instance, especially high level of infestation by nest dwelling ectoparasites can be recorded on colony sites that are recurrently used by high densities of seabird hosts, which may have strong implications for the circulation of arthropod-borne infectious agents. Several species are known to be hosts of infectious agents of medical and veterinary importance, such as Lyme disease Borrelia, Salmonella spp, Campylobacter spp, Avian Influenza viruses and West Nile Virus, but little is known about their eco-epidemiology and the effects they may have on host populations. In some cases, disease agents can threaten endangered seabird populations, which may have consequences in terms of conservation and management. In some other cases, endoparasites may affect the energy budgets of hosts, with potential direct and indirect implications on their fitness. Moreover, given their particular histories, seabirds are expected to invest in long term specific immunity as they may be re-exposed to the same infectious agents during their lives, but surprisingly little is actually known on these aspects. Finally, the potential interactions between pollutants, stress level and parasitism is of growing concern. In this symposium, recent advances in this broad field will be outlined by a series of invited talks on these topics. We hope also to be able to include a selection of contributed talks and posters.

Contacts of the conveners: Thierry BOULINIER, Centre d’Ecologie Fonctionnelle et Evolutive (CEFE) CNRS UMR 5175, Montpellier, France. Email: Thierry.Boulinier@cefe.cnrs.fr. Web page: http://www.cefe.cnrs.fr/en/ecologie-spatiale-des-populations/thierry-boulinier

Sarah BURTHE, CEH, Bush Estate, Penicuik, Scotland, UK, EH26 0QB. Email: sburthe@ceh.ac.uk. Web page: http://www.ceh.ac.uk/staffwebpages/drsarahburthe.html

Thanks !